Danish Gambit Part 3

1. e4 e5 2.d4 exd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Bc4 cxb2 5.Bxb2 Bb4+

 

6. Nd2 Another attempt. White is keeping the long diagonal opened; the pawn g7 is under attack.  

6…Qg5 A very aggressive approach. Black aims at the pawn on g2 and seems that nothing could stop it’s intention of trading the Queens after 7. g3 Qd2! going into a simple ending up two pawns.  

Indeed as we were seeing before white prefers to continue the development:

7. Ngf3! white is going to sacrifice another pawn for the speedy development and a strong initiative, using one of the most important attacking principles of the First WC Wilhelm Steinitz:

 “If you have the advantage, you have not only a right to attack, but also a duty to attack, otherwise there is the risk of losing the advantage.“

 

7…Qxg2 8.Rg1

At the moment black is three pawns up, but the g7 pawn is unprotected  

 

 

 

After 8….Qh3 9. Bg7 white gains the decisive material advantage. So… the last chance to mix up the opponent could be  8…Bxd2+

Now if 9. Kd2 then Queen Escapes from the trap with the check 9…Qf2,

While 9. Qd2 leaves the knight f3 suddenly unprotected. 9. Nd2 is also bad, because of 9…Qg1+.

 

Indeed white has prepared an effective refutation: 9. Ke2!! A strong intermediate move! At the moment black has a huge material advantage, but his only developed pieces under attack. 

 

9…Qh3

 

10. Qxd2 Look at black’s pieces all ugly placed on the back rank.

 

 

White’s advantages contains:

 

A huge development advantage;

 

A clear superiority in the center;

 

Nice targets f7 and g7 pawns for his powerful bishops. 

 

10…Nf6 11.Bxf7+!  A very natural combination.

 

Frankly speaking, we have seen similar tactical hits many times already.

 

But be careful: The immediate 11.Ng5 fails after 11…Qh5+! And black might survive.

 

11…Kd8

If 11… Kf8, trying to hide the King on the Kingside, then 12.Qg5 Qh6 13. Qh6 gh 14.Bf6 leading to huge material loses.

 

12. Rxg7 Knight f6 is hanging, so black is opting for the following desperate effort.

 

 

12…Nxe4

The King is cramped by its own pieces and pawns, which gives white a chance to come with a decisive strike, once again in the shape of a neat queen sacrifice.

 

13. Qg5+ distracts the knight from the f6 square when after

 

13… Nxg5

 

14.Bf6#  

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2 Responses

  1. very nice! thanks

  2. Dear Boris Alterman, and what about when black don’t play aggressively playing 6… Nf6 , then 7…0-0 and 8…d6 ? I think black has very quite position.

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